News Archive

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October 21, 2016

Josh Whitman, Athletic Director, talks about his experience taking Classical
Mythology as an undergrad at the U of I!

Postmarks 2016
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September 25, 2016

Heartland Graduate Workshop in Ancient Studies

September 30 - October 1, 2016

Lucy Ellis Lounge, 1080 Foreign Languages Building

707 S Mathews Ave, Urbana, IL

Sponsored by the Dept. of the Classics

Conference website

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August 2, 2016

Antony Augoustakis has just published a collection of articles in the series Oxford Readings in Classical Studies, Titled Flavian Epic. The epics of the three Flavian poets-Silius Italicus, Statius, and Valerius Flaccus-have, in recent times, attracted the attention of scholars, who have re-evaluated the particular merits of Flavian poetry as far more than imitation of the traditional norms and patterns. Drawn from sixty years of scholarship, this edited collection is the first volume to collate the most influential modern academic writings on Flavian epic poetry, revised and updated to provide both scholars and students alike with a broad yet comprehensive overview of the field.

https://global.oup.com/academic/product/flavian-epic-9780199650668?cc=gr&lang=en&

Flavian Epic




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August 16, 2016

Serena
Please welcome Serena Witzke (Ph.D. UNC-Chapel Hill) to the Dept. of the Classics as the new visiting position in Classics and Classical Reception for 2016-17. Dr. Witzke specializes in Roman and Greek comedy, women and gender in the ancient world, and the reception of the classical tradition. Her dissertation focused on Oscar Wilde and the ancient comic recognition plot. A recent publication, "Harlots, Tarts, and Hussies? A Problem of Terminology for Sex Labor in Roman Comedy" (Helios 42.1 (Spring 2015) 7-27) won the Women’s Classical Caucus Barbara McManus Award for Best Published Article in 2016. Dr. Witzke has recent teaching experience at at Ohio Wesleyan University and Wake Forest University. She will be teaching “Ancient Greek and Roman Religion", "Classical Allusions in Cinema"  and "The Comic Imagination" in the fall.

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August 16, 2016
Kate

Please welcome Katharine Kreindler (Ph.D. Stanford) to the Dept. of the Classics as the new visiting position in archaeology for 2016-17. Dr. Kreindler has extensive experience excavating in Italy. Her research focuses on consumption and exchange in central Italy (specifically, Poggio Civitate, where she will be spending the summer conducting field work) and she has recent teaching experience at San Francisco State University. She will be teaching “Introduction to Greek Archaeology”, “Development of Ancient Cities” and “Archaeology of Rome” in the fall.

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traill


Ariana's Distinguished Award

Ariana Traill, Dept. Head for Classics, was awarded the Campus Executive Officer Distinguished Leadership Award. The ceremony to receive this prestigious award is scheduled for Wednesday, May 11, at 4 p.m. at the Alice Campbell Alumni Center. Congratulations Ariana!
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Professor Antony Augoustakis led the 112th meeting of the Classical Association of the Middle West and South as the association’s President (March 16-18, 2016) in Williamsburgh,VA. His presidential address “Visualizing Epic” (https://camws.org/112thMeetingWilliamsburg) was delivered at the meeting’s banquet on Friday evening. A huge contingent of Illinois faculty and undergraduate and graduate students attended, delivering papers at the convention.

Antony



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March 15, 2016
oxford
Statius
Statius, Thebaid 8

Edited with an Introduction, Translation, and Commentary

Edited by Antony Augoustakis

Description

Composed at the end of the first century CE, Statius' Thebaid recounts the civil war in Thebes between the two sons of Oedipus, Polynices and Eteocles, and the horrific events that take place on the battlefield. Its author, the Roman poet Statius, employed a wide variety of Greco-Roman sources in order to narrate the Argive expedition against Thebes and the fratricidal war. Book 8 opens with the descent of the Argive seer Amphiaraus to the Underworld through a chasm of the earth; the soldiers mourn their seer's loss and elect a successor, Thiodamas, who placates Earth (Tellus) through a prayer, before the opening of the second day of hostilities. The book reaches its climax when fierce Tydeus is mortally wounded and dies having committed an act of cannibalism by eating his opponent's brains; Minerva leaves the battlefield in disgust, taking away from her protege the intended gift of immortality.

In this volume, Augoustakis presents the first full-length edition of Thebaid 8, with text and apparatus criticus, and an English translation. A detailed introduction discusses the Argive/Theban myth in the Greek and Roman literary tradition and art, as well as the reception of the book in subsequent centuries, especially in Dante's Divine Comedy. The accompanying commentary provides useful notes which explore questions of interpretation and Statius' language and literary craft, with particular emphasis on the exploitation of various Greek and Latin intertexts in Statius' poetry.

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February 10, 2016

Youth Classics Camps (Ages 9-12)

Meet the Romans

Meet the Romans introduces youth to ancient Roman civilization. Learn about gods, heroes, and monsters, gladiators and chariot-racing, and real Roman artifacts here on campus. Put on your toga and armor as you create your own Roman arts and crafts, excavate artifacts, engineer (chocolate) roads, play Roman games and sports, throw a Roman banquet, and learn some Latin, too. (Attention parents: Latin is a great way to boost advanced English vocabulary. Over 90% of English words of more than two syllables come from Latin.) Carpe Diem.

To learn more about our daily activities, news and events, visit our Facebook page.

Camp Information

Dates: June 6-10 and June 13-17, 2016 (different activities each week)
Times: 8:30-12:30
Ages: 9-12 Class size: 7-15 students

Instructor: Whitney McComas
Program price: $130/week, plus $50 materials and registration processing fee. Sibling discount available. Minimum registration is one week.
Location: The Spurlock Museum. Campers will walk to other campus locations, including the University Quad and Spurlock Museum.

 

Meet the Greeks!

"Meet the Greeks" introduces kids to ancient Greek civilization. Learn about Greek mythology, the Olympic games, Greek warfare & daily life, and what happens to a Greek hero when he doesn't listen to an oracle. Try wearing Greek clothing and check out ancient toys. You will create your own Greek arts and crafts and learn a little language too. You do not have to be Percy Jackson to wrie your own name in cool Greek letters and read simple stories in ancient Greek. (Attention parents: Greek roots abound in English, especially in technical vocabulary. They are not hard to identify once kids know the basics, for an English vocabulary boost.)

Camp Information

Dates: June 6-10 and 13-17, 2016 (offered twice, with different activities)
Times: 1:00 - 5:00 pm (may be combined with "Meet the Romans" in the morning for a single registration processing fee). Lunch supervision will be provided for children who register for the full day.
Ages: 9-12
Program cost: $130/week, plus $50 materials and registration processing fee. Sibling discount available. Minimum registration is one week. Registration form and full policy details:http://www.languageacademy.illinois.edu/programs/summer-camps/
Location: The Spurlock Museum. Campers will walk to other campus locations, including the University Quad and Spurlock Museum
Food: Campers must bring their own snacks/lunch. We are a nut-free environment.
Questions: Contact Classics Camps director Ariana Traill
Staff: Meet the Classics Staff

To learn more about our daily activities, news and events, visit our Facebook page.


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January 7, 2016
Classics is proud to recognize Antony Augoustakis as winner of one of this year's Society for Classical Studies Awards For Excellence in College Teaching.

AWARDS PRESENTATION AT THE 2016 SCS ANNUAL MEETING

Augoustakis

Text of the presentation on January 8, 2016 at the SCS Annual Meeting in San Francisco.

Every semester the University of Illinois publishes a list of teachers ranked as excellent by their students. And virtually every semester Dr. Antony Augoustakis’s name appears on that list, whether he teaches an introductory course on Roman civilization or a graduate course in Latin Prose composition. His dedication to his students and his willingness to go out of his way for them can be seen in the extra sessions he offers students who enter a Medieval Latin class with less preparation than Classics majors or in his personal mentoring of undergraduates who, with his encouragement, attend and present at the annual Eta Sigma Phi conference.

Students praise Dr. Augoustakis as a demanding but inspirational teacher. One undergraduate reports hearing Dr. Augoustakis’s voice in his head, urging him to re-enroll in Greek. Another student says “he uprooted my experiences and knowledge of Latin, Roman history, and Western history in the best way possible.” A third: “at the end of all of our classes, I have realized with a mixture of shock and pride just how much I have learned and grown intellectually.” And yet students also praise his flexibility, his willingness to meet with students individually as often as they wish, and his efforts to tailor special assignments in the class to each student’s needs and interests.

Colleagues also credit Dr. Augoustakis with “almost single-handedly” rebuilding the graduate program in Illinois, revamping the curriculum, mentoring student research and publication, and finding effective, innovative methods of teaching mixed graduate-undergraduate advanced reading courses (a challenge all of us who have attempted this feat recognize as daunting). At the same time, he revived Illinois’s chapter of Eta Sigma Phi, serves as its faculty advisor, and regularly recruits undergraduates to attend the national meeting and participate as presenters and competitors. He has created and taught multiple new course offerings at every level and teaches language courses which range from archaic Greek lyric to post-classical Latin. It is no wonder that his nominator calls him “the heart and soul of the Classics program at Illinois.” The Society for Classical Studies is delighted to honor his many contributions with the SCS Award for Excellence in the Teaching of Classics at the College Level.

Augoustakis 2



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CLASSICS UNDERGRADUATE TRAVEL AWARD

The Classics Department is offering a travel award to be used between June 2016 and June 2017. The award amount, $2,000.00, may be used for any summer program that focuses on the Greek or Latin language, including pedagogy and/or oral Greek/Latin, or Greek or Roman literature, history, or culture, including art, architecture and archaeology, including participation in excavations.

Eligibility

All full-time students majoring in Classics are eligible to apply for this award.

Application

Please send a brief description, not exceeding 300 words, of:

  • - your proposed program, with a web link
  • - the benefits you expect to gain from participating in this program

Deadline for application: Monday, February 1, 2016.

Submit applications to Ariana Traill, Chair of the Committee on Honors and Awards, traill@illinois.edu. Awards will be made on the basis of the merits of the plan of study and your academic performance in Classics courses. All funds will be paid in the form of reimbursements, via your student account.

Donors

This award is made possible through the generous support of alumni and friends of the Department of the Classics. The winner will be contacted within a few weeks of the deadline, so (s)he may finalize travel plans, and announced formally at the Classics Achievement Ceremony, Friday, May 13, 2016 4:00-5:15, Mediterranean Gallery, Spurlock Museum.

PAST WINNERS

James Stark attended the 2015American Academy in Rome Classical Summer School Audrey Majors attended the 2014 Summer Living Latin in Rome Program
James Stark Audrey Majors

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DISTINGUISHED AWARD

Antony Augoustakis is the recipient of a 2015 Campus Distinguished Promotion Award. The award from the Provost's office, given upon the recommendation of the Campus Committee on Promotion and Tenure, recognizes exceptional contributions in the area of scholarship, teaching, service and engagement efforts. Antony shares the award, which comes with a discretionary fund to support scholarly activities, with two other colleagues promoted to full professor.


The New Heroes on Screen, An international conference at the European Cultural Centre of Delphi, Greece, 29 June - 1 July, 2015.


Organizers: Antony Augoustakis (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign) and Stacie Raucci (Union College)

In the last decade, there has been a proliferation of screen representations of ancient Greek mythological heroes, both in original movies and remakes of original films (Immortals, Clash of the Titans, Hercules, 300). Scholars of the Classical Reception will present papers at an international conference to be held in Delphi, Greece, the omphalos of the earth, analysing the depiction of heroism in recent films (Greek or Roman), the role of gender, race, ethnicity, sexuality, violence, technology, and fan reception.

Dating to 1960, the Conference Centre at Delphi is a typical example of architecture of the Modern Movement designed by Architecture Professor A. Kitsikis and architect A. Lambakis. Spreadover an area of 100,000 square metres, the complex is composed of a Conference Centre, a Guest House and an Open-Air Theatre. The E.C.C.D. is also responsible for the Museum of Delphic Festivals (Angelos and Eva Sikelianos Residence).

Full program can be found here: http://publish.illinois.edu/aaugoust/conferences/new-heroes-on-screen-july-2015/

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View the List of Teachers Ranked as Excellent given to the Classics Faculty


View the List of Teachers Ranked as Excellent give to the Graduate Teaching Assistants

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Classics Youth Camp, June 2015

Meet the Romans introduces kids to ancient Roman civilization. Learn about gods, heroes, and monsters, gladiators and chariot-racing, and real Roman artifacts here on campus. Put on your toga and armor as you create your own Roman arts and crafts, excavate artifacts, engineer (chocolate) roads, play Roman games and sports, throw a Roman banquet, and learn some Latin, too. (Attention parents: Latin is a great way to boost advanced English vocabulary: over 90% of English words of more than two syllables come from Latin.) Carpe diem!

Dates (offered twice) June 8-12, June 22-26, 2015
Times 8:30 am-noon and 1:30-5:00 pm (half day); 8:30-5:00 (full day)
Ages 10-13, Class size 10-18
Program price $160/week (half day); $320/week (full day), plus $50 materials and registration processing fee. Sibling discount available. Minimum registration is one week (half day). Registration form and full policy details: www.languageacademy.illinois.edu/summer_camps.html.
Location Based in Bevier Hall, 905 S. Goodwin Ave. Urbana, Room 372. Campers will walk to other campus locations, including the University Quad and Spurlock Museum.
Food Campers must bring their own snacks/lunch. We are a nut free environment.
Questions
Contact Classics Camps director Ariana Traill (traill@illinois.edu)

Word Power from Latin and Greek
Word Power is for teens who want a competitive edge in school and on standardized tests while learning about ancient civilizations of Greece and Rome. Over 60% of all English words have Greek or Latin roots, as does 90% of the vocabulary of the sciences and technology. Learn lots of common roots and add words like querulous and internecine to your vocabulary. Campers will learn a little language history and some fun facts about the ancient Greeks and Romans. At the end of the camp, you can test your skills and win prizes in Roots Jeopardy.

Dates June 15-19, 2015
Times 8:30-5:00 (full day)
Ages 14-17
Class size 10-20
Program price $320, plus $50 materials and registration processing fee. Sibling discount available. Registration form and full policy details: www.languageacademy.illinois.edu/summer_camps.html
Location Based in Lincoln Hall, 702 S. Wright St, Urbana, Room 1062. Campers will walk to other campus locations, including the University Quad and Spurlock Museum.
Food Campers must bring their own snacks/lunch. We are a nut free environment.
Questions Contact Classics Camps director Ariana Traill (traill@illinois.edu)

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AUGOUSTAKIS CAMWS PRESIDENT


Augoustakis

The Department congratulates Antony Augoustakis, who is now president of the Classical Association of the Middle West and South.

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ANNOUNCING NEW VISITING LECTURER
Dr. James Kruck

The Classics Department is pleased to announce that Dr. James Kruck has accepted a position as visiting lecturer this spring. Dr. Kruck received his Ph.D. from the University of Western Ontario, with a dissertation on the translation practices of Roman poets, particularly the Augustans, entitled "The Modalities of Roman Translation: Source-representative, Allusive, and Independent." He has since taught at Quest University in British Columbia.  Dr. Kruck will be teaching CLCV 132, 222 and Latin 491, topic: Horace and Catullus.


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CLASSICS AWARDS CEREMONY
Friday, May 16th Workman Gallery of Ancient Mediterranean Cultures, Spurlock Museum

Professor Ariana Traill , Head of the Classics Department congratulating Professor Antony Augoustakis, Centennial Scholar of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
Professor Araiana Traill, Head of the Classics Department congratulating Professor Antony Augoustakis, Centennial Scholar of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Ariana Traill, Head of Classics, welcomes faculty, students and guests to the Awards Ceremony
Ariana Traill, Head of Classics, welcomes faculty, students and guests to the Awards Ceremony


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ANTONY AUGOUSTAKIS NAMED COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES CENTENNIAL SCHOLAR

Please join us in congratulating Professor Augoustakis on being named a College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Centennial Scholar. In 2013-14, LAS will be celebrating its 100th anniversary. Ten of these positions were created to confer special recognition of faculty who demonstrably raise the stature and visibility of the units and college.

We are very proud to be able to share this good news -- both for Prof. Augoustakis and for Classics.

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CLASSICS MAJOR GIVES VALUABLE SKILLS FOR GRAD SCHOOL AND BEYOND

5/13/13 by Bailey Bryant, Daily Illini

After becoming bored with the biology involved in pre-medicine, uninterested in organic chemistry and apathetic toward accounting, Julia Henninger, senior in LAS, began pursuing her fourth and final major: classics.

Read more

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NEWLY PUBLISHED BOOKS BY ANTONY AUGOUSTAKIS AND ARIANA TRAILL

Ritual and Religion in Flavian Epic
Edited by Antony Augoustakis
This edited collection addresses the role of ritual representations and religion in the epic poems of the Flavian period (69-96 CE): Valerius Flaccus' Argonautica, Silius Italicus' Punica, Statius' Thebaid, and the unfinished Achilleid. Drawing on various modern studies on religion and ritual, and the relationship between literature and religion in the Greco-Roman world, it explores how we can interpret the poets' use of the relationship between gods and humans, cults and rituals, religious activities, and the role of the seer / prophet and his identification with poetry.
http://www.oup.com/localecatalogue/cls_academic/?i=9780199644094


Ritual and Religion in Flavian Epic

Blackwell Companion to Terence
Edited by Antony Augoustakis and Ariana Traill
A comprehensive collection of essays by leading scholars in the field that address, in a single volume, several key issues in interpreting Terence offering a detailed study of Terence’s plays and situating them in their socio-historical context, as well as documenting their reception through to present day
http://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-1405198753.html

A Companion to Terence

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KIRK SANDERS RECEIVES EXCELLENCE IN UNDERGRADUATE TEACHING AWARD

Professor Kirk Sanders of the Department of the Classics has been named a recipient of the Campus Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching. He will be recognized at the Celebration of Teaching Excellence scheduled for April 23 at the Alice Campbell Alumni Center.

The peer-nominated award recognizes professors, instructional staff members and graduate teaching assistants who display consistently excellent performance in the classroom, take innovative approaches to teaching, positively affect the lives of their students, and make other contributions to improve instruction, including influencing the curriculum.

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ANGELIKI TZANETOU - CITY OF SUPPLIANTS: TRAGEDY AND THE ATHENIAN EMPIRE, UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS PRESS, 2012

After fending off Persia in the fifth century BCE, Athens assumed a leadership position in the Aegean world. Initially it led the Delian League, a military alliance against the Persians, but eventually the league evolved into an empire with Athens in control and exacting tribute from its former allies. Athenians justified this subjection of their allies by emphasizing their fairness and benevolence towards them, which gave Athens the moral right to lead. But Athenians also believed that the strong rule over the weak and that dominating others allowed them to maintain their own freedom. These conflicting views about Athens’ imperial rule found expression in the theater, and this book probes how the three major playwrights dramatized Athenian imperial ideology.

Through close readings of Aeschylus’ Eumenides, Euripides’ Children of Heracles, and Sophocles’ Oedipus at Colonus, as well as other suppliant dramas, Angeliki Tzanetou argues that Athenian tragedy performed an important ideological function by representing Athens as a benevolent and moral ruler that treated foreign suppliants compassionately. She shows how memorable and disenfranchised figures of tragedy, such as Orestes and Oedipus, or the homeless and tyrant-pursued children of Heracles were generously incorporated into the public body of Athens, thus reinforcing Athenians’ sense of their civic magnanimity. This fresh reading of the Athenian suppliant plays deepens our understanding of how Athenians understood their political hegemony and reveals how core Athenian values such as justice, freedom, piety, and respect for the laws intersected with imperial ideology.

Angeliki Tzanetou is Associate Professor of Classics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She is coeditor with Maryline Parca of Finding Persephone: Women’s Rituals in the Ancient Mediterranean and has published articles on ritual and gender in drama and on tragedy and politics.

http://www.utexas.edu/utpress/books/tzacit.html

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NEW CLASSICS FACULTY

It is our great pleasure to announce that Professor Brian Walters, currently visiting, will be joining us permanently. He has just accepted our offer of a tenure-track position.

Professor Walters, PhD University of California at Los Angeles (2011), is a specialist in Latin Prose Literature (Violence in Cicero). He holds a visiting appointment at our Department this year. He is in the process of publishing a monograph: based on his dissertation, as well as several articles, one of which is in a prominent peer-reviewed journal (Classical Quarterly). He is also the author of a translation of Lucan’s Civil War (forthcoming from Hackett Press in 2013). He is also a distinguished teacher (as many of our undergraduates already know).

Please join us in welcoming Professor Walters!

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CLASSICS GRADUATE STUDENT IN THE NEWS

"Sebastian Anderson's Classics MA thesis on Archilochus was selected to represent the University of Illinois at the Midwestern Association of Graduate Schools (MAGS) Distinguished Master's Thesis Award. This is a very competitive process, and we are thrilled that Sebastian's thesis will represent the University."